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Nashville Pussy - Power Pussy

Nashville Pussy - Power Pussy Brought to you by: guitar.com

Np Jpg 18926Few bands party like Nashville Pussy. It's something they've raised to an art form except that this isn't a band interested in raising anything other than HELL. Not ones to intellectualize or ponder lifes myriad meanings, Nashville Pussy are about finding the primordial riff and stomping the sucker to death. Their '70s based refried boogie mixes rhythms ranging from AC/DC to ZZ Top with heavy stop-offs at Grand Funk Railroad and Ted Nugent station (The intro to the Nuges Wang Dang Sweet Poontang off Double Live Gonzo inspired the band's name). The Pussy's two hot chicks (no sexism here, they're damn proud to be chicks -- hear and see them roar), bassist Corey Parks and guitarist Ruyter Suys (pronounced Rider Sighs) lead the Nashville Pussy sonic and visual assault. And just in case you've got it in mind, young man, to approach Ms. Suys, let it be known that thats her husband on lead vocals and guitar, Blaine Cartwright. However, so far as we know, the towering Parks (whose brother is NBA star Cherokee Parks) is fair game, so go for it.

Nashville Pussy have just released their second album High As Hell. The band earned a Grammy nomination for their 1998 debut Let Them Eat Pussy, but the disc didn't earn like respect from their label Mercury, which bought the debut album from the independent label Amphetamine Reptile and subsequently dropped the band during a recent music business upheaval. Nash Pussy have since found a home at TVT Records and plan on touring for as many of their nine lives as possible. Guitar.com sat down with Ruyter Suys to discuss what it means to be a real hot Pussy.

Guitar.com: How would you describe the music scene in the mid-'90s when you were beginning Nashville Pussy?

Ruyter Suys: Oh, horrible. We were riding the end of the wave of every college boy in the world picking up a fucking guitar and deciding to be a shoe-gazing kind of guitar player. That's shit, all that Nirvana stuff. The music scene in general, has sucked for a while, but '96 was definitely a low point.

Guitar.com: How often do you tour?

Suys: It's more like how often do we take off? (Laughs) We tour pretty much full time. Like from now til September, it looks like we don't have any days off. We were counting on six days in August, but it doesn't look like that's going to happen now.

Guitar.com: I guess it's a good thing that your husband is in the band then. Otherwise, you'd never see each other.

Suys: It wouldn't work. We've been married for seven years. He was in a band [called Nine Pound Hammer] when we first got together. The longest they'd be gone is three months for a stretch, which is pretty fucking heavy. I went back up to Canada and got a job and shit. I wasn't going to just sit around the house.

Guitar.com: So, did you tell him you had to be in the next band?

Suys: It wasn't like that. I was being really specific in my flyers, saying we needed somebody who was into AC/DC, Dick Dale and the Sonics. I had one guy call me and say Yeah, I'm into Sonic Youth. And it was like, No! The Sonics! The opposite of Sonic Youth! There was nobody there. So when Blaine's band broke up on the road, and we'd been playing together forever, we started jamming with his old drummer and that was the beginning of this band. It wasn't even on purpose. It was by accident.

Guitar.com: What was the difference with this record? You recorded with Kurt Bloch again.

Suys: Yeah, we did it with Kurt again. We had more time and a more luxurious studio. The old studio we had to stop playing at eight and when you're in a rock band, you don't get up until 9 PM. We were in there at noon slamming coffee just trying to get ready for the day. We'd just get going around 7 PM and then have to shut down because it was in this residential area. The next place we could play around the clock, which was great. We had about four times as much time to do the whole album and we got to know Kurt a little better.

Guitar.com: Describe your set-up in the studio.

Suys: We were all in the same room and I think it was more live than what we did last time. We just played through monitors rather than headsets. Playing through headsets the first time and that can be kind of annoying when you're banging your head. We overdubbed two of the solos, otherwise it was live. We played all the songs on the road [before we recorded]. We recorded at Litho in Seattle. It's owned by one of the Pearl Jam dudes, who we never got to see, thank God (laughs). We worked on it for three weeks as opposed to five days, which I think is what we spent on the first album.

Guitar.com: Talk about opening for Motorhead.

Suys: It's so fucking cool. It's like were doing God's work or something. It's like were missionaries of rock. Motorhead is the band that started the fire that was burning within me and is still burning. It's like a religious thing. And not only do you get to meet these guys, but you find out that they still rock and they're still cool and they're smart. They're the perfect mentors for the people in our band. They got it down for partying and rocking, their two biggest priorities. One doesn't get in the way of the other and they're each equally important. It's brilliant.

Guitar.com: What about the Grammy experience? How did you like being nominated?

Suys: Oh God. I'd like to go back and win (laughs). It was pretty lame, sitting there listening to Rosie O'Donnell make those horrible fucking jokes. It was like this Cinderella story up until we lost. The red carpet was pretty cool. We had our own limo and we were smoking pot and drinking all the booze. We were kind of nervous and stuff, and we were all dressed to the nines and you get there at one in the afternoon, some ungodly hour, really early in the rock 'n' roll day. And we'd been up for hours getting ourselves all fancified and Grammyfied and we met AC/DC and we saw this huge line of people and we thought, Ah, we gotta stand through that? and it's like No, you guys are artists you get to go down the red carpet. We sauntered on down. And there's this section of hyperfans who are fanatics of anything and they just cheer at anybody who walks by and there were like ten people there who had Kiss shirts on and they knew who we were and they started screaming. We started playing it up. Corey bent over and I slapped her ass and these people started freaking out, screaming Pussy and suddenly theres people with microphones coming up to us asking who we were. Fucking funny. I don't think any of it landed on TV.

Guitar.com: What happened with Mercury? They reissued the first album and then dropped you?

Suys: They bought it from Am-Rep (indie label Amphetamine Reptile), reissued it, repackaged it, put a little bonus disc in it for the first 40,000 or something like that and promoted it for a little while and then they had that big fucking merger. Business gets in the way of rock 'n' roll, it seems like.

Guitar.com: Youd think at least the Grammy nomination would ensure a second record?

Suys: Yeah, but the guy who was heading the company by the time we got fired was a prick, man. When we had first gotten signed to Mercury, the head of the company was Danny Goldberg, who worked with Zeppelin when he was, like, 21. So this guy carries weight. When he walks into the room, you hold your breath a bit because he's so cool. You read about him in Hammer of the Gods. He got the offer to leave Mercury and we were Danny's band, so once he was gone, we were left with the fools who remain. It was a real pity because we had these really cool people working with us who were really into sticking us into peoples faces. Pretty much everybody got fired. So by the time they laid us off, the guy who let the hammer down wasn't Danny Goldberg but a guy who worked with UB40. We can't respect that. When we went to the Grammys we were hoping he'd be like, "Congratulations for being a loud ass punk rock band and getting a Grammy nomination," and we were hinting at him, like, "C'mon say something friendly," and this guy said, "We have 30 bands with Grammy nominations this year." It was like, Screw you, dude!

Guitar.com: Lots of music in the 90s seemed to lack a sense of humor.

Suys: That's why we started this band. In Nashville everyone was so jaded. We wanted to get back to the reason you start playing in the first place: to get laid. It's such a primitive thing, rock 'n' roll.

Guitar.com: But that's an odd thing then. You and your husband are obviously married.

Suys: We're already getting laid (laughs).

Guitar.com: Exactly, what are you doing in a band then?

Suys: I guess to get more laid (laughs). We want to have it all. Well, it works, man. Blaine was playing in a band and he got me.

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