Orgy - Tangled Limbs and Thrusting Torsos The Sonic Gang Bang of Orgy

Orgy - Tangled Limbs and Thrusting Torsos  The Sonic Gang Bang of Orgy Brought to you by: guitar.com

Orgy were the first outfit signed to Korn's Elementree label, and co-guitarist Ryan Shuck relies on seven-string axes similar to those of Korn's Munky and Head. But even though Orgy's music sometimes recalls the surging energy of the band that promoted them, the Los Angeles-based quintet is no "Korn Jr." The tunes on Orgy's debut album, Candyass, have more in common with the industrial/metal firepower of Marilyn Manson, the new wave flash of Duran Duran, the gothic gloom of Sisters of Mercy, and the rhythmic electronic pop of Depeche Mode and New Order. Orgy even achieved mainstream recognition with a propulsive cover of New Order's dance-floor standard "Blue Monday."

The majority of Orgy's unique ear candy on tunes like "Stitches," "Platinum," and "Dizzy," emanates from the dynamic guitar work of Shuck and synth axeman Amir Derakh. But if you're wondering how Orgy orchestrate their guitar passages, don't expect any clear-cut answers. "Obviously a lot of people don't care who is playing whateither they like the music or they don't," Derakh says. "But for people who do want to figure it out in our music, I bet it becomes quite interesting. For instance, and a lot of times I'll play what would almost sound like the bass rhythm, while our bass player Paige [Haley] plays a higher distorted sound."

Guitar.com: Anything to say about the name Orgy?

Ryan Shuck: We kind of justified it as a coming together of all sorts of different sounds. Of course, we're strip club monsters, but that has zero to do with our name, other than that we pull 'em in like flies [laughs].

Guitar.com: What does the title Candyass signify?

Shuck: A drag queen basically. We thought it sort of fits. It's kind of us making fun of ourselves, like, "Ya, we're a bunch of pussies who wear makeup."

Guitar.com: Would you call yourselves "technical" musicians?

Shuck: We're pretty gear-oriented, but we're not very technical as guitar players. We're not interested in solos and the typical guitar player approach. A note can say a lot when played over some sort of a progression. Less confusion is better. Derakh: It's mainly about melodies, sounds, and rhythms.

Guitar.com: Amir, what kind of synths do you rely on?

Derakh: They're pretty much all from Roland, who have cornered the market on that stuff.

Guitar.com: Who were some of your synth influences?

Derakh: While growing I listened to a lot of Allan Holdsworth. I was really into synth in general, whether it was guitar synth or Moog. Everybody from Gary Numan to Dead or Alive to fusion groups like Return to Forever, and the stuff Steve Hackett played in Genesis.

Guitar.com: What role do pedals play in your guitar work?

Shuck: A lot of my effects involve four or five pedals at once. We have hundreds of different pedals and we run them through almost anything. I use a MIDI ground control with them. And we plug into anything that will change the way a guitar normally sounds. We've used almost everything you can use on a guitar, and maybe some things we shouldn't have used. Whoever's in the studio just gets down on his hands and knees and starts tweaking pedals and sticking them through different things. If you turn the guitar on and its just sounds like a guitar, then something's gotta be done to it. That's the only rule I suppose, if there is a rule. We can get a cool sound and write a part from it, or we can have a part that's really cool and design a sound for it.

Guitar.com: Any secrets to reveal about singer Jay Gordon's lyrics?

Shuck: He likes for people to pick their own meanings out of a song. He will never give too much away as to what the song is about. He thinks that would demystify the song, and you wouldn't be able to adapt it as easily to your own experiences. The tunes are designed for you to "put on" and make them part of your life. A lot of them are based on real life and a lot of them are liesjust a bunch of bullshit and fairy tales.

Guitar.com: Does the band have a specific raison d'etre?

Shuck: The whole point of our band is to explore new things, but still write good songs. A lot of bands that are too experimental forget about songs. The songs count the most. If they didn't, than our music would just be noise.
Derakh: Yeah, we could have made a really abstract record, and that's not to say we won't, but at this point we enjoy mixing the abstract with melody and some good arrangements, to make the songs listenable.

Guitar.com: How would you compare your version of New Order's "Blue Monday" to the original?

Derakh: We love the original, and know that a lot of people hold it in high regard. So we knew we had to do it justice. The original was a dance hit with a straight line of dynamics, and we thought we would use our style of dynamics to add something to it. I don't think we really knew how it was going to come out until we were done with it, and even then, we were somewhat hesitant about having it on the record. But after we lived with it for a while, we really felt strongly about it.

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